In this online guest talk philosopher of emotions Prof. Michael Brady focuses on suffering beyond its obvious negative aspects.

Datum: 7. Dezember 2020
Zeit: 17.15 Uhr bis 19.00 Uhr
Ort: via Zoom

Prof. Michael Brady

In his talk Prof. Michael Brady (University of Glasgow) discusses how philosophers since Aristotle as well as religious traditions and secular schools of thought have been pondering the relation between suffering and meaning. He maintains that suffering is often key to creating meaning. For further information about the content of the planned talk, please have a look at the flyer.

Live Online Talk via Zoom
Due to the current health crisis, the talk (in English) will take place via Zoom (Meeting-ID: 984 5496 8126; Recognition Code: 039593).
We kindly ask you to keep your microphone/audio off during the talk. Please note that due to a recording of the talk taking place, you will be asked to click on a button "Continue" (if you are using Zoom in English) or "Fortfahren" (for Zoom in German)  to signal your approval for the recording in order to be able to join the Zoom meeting and listen to the talk.

Video Podcast
If you can't join us via Zoom: A video podcast will be made available on the University of Lucerne's official SWITCHtube website. As it might take a few days before we can upload the podcast, you can request a notification from the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences with a direct link to the podcast - please just write to gslremove-this.@remove-this.unilu.ch. Alternatively, check out the news on the Graduate School's website where we will advertise the podcast as soon as it is available. 

Interview in Luzerner Zeitung (for subscribers to the newspaper only)
On December 5, the Luzerner Zeitung published an interview with Michael Brady on the occasion of his guest talk. 

Disclaimer
Prof. Brady had been invited by Manuel Camassa, doctoral student in Philosophy at the University of Lucerne, in the framework of a workshop titled "The Role of Empathy and Other Moral Emotions in Ethics", which unfortunately due to the Coronavirus crisis had to be cancelled.